"Outside a dog a book is man's best friend, inside a dog it is too dark to read!" -Groucho Marx========="The person, be it gentleman or lady, who has not pleasure in a good novel, must be intolerably stupid." -Jane Austen========="I don’t believe in the kind of magic in my books. But I do believe something very magical can happen when you read a good book."-JK Rowling========"I spend a lot of time reading." -Bill Gates=========“Ahhh. Bed, book, kitten, sandwich. All one needed in life, really.” -Jacqueline Kelly=========

Thursday, October 1, 2015

Friday Quotes: October 2

Book Beginnings on Friday is hosted by Rose City ReaderShare the opening quote from the book.
The Friday 56 is hosted at Freda's VoiceFind a quote from page 56.

Check out the links for the rules and for the posts of the participants each week. Participants don't select their favorite, coolest, or most intellectual books, they just use the one they are currently reading. This is the book I'm reading right now: 

Book title: Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End by Atul Gawande

Book Beginnings:
I learned a lot of things in medical school, but mortality wasn't one of them.
Friday 56:
She and Felix felt the sorrows of their losses but also the pleasures of what they still had...One day, however, they had an experience that revealed just how fragile their life had become.
Comments: My parents are in their 80s. Each time I am with them I have to confront their mortality as I see them age. I hope that they both can experience a good ending to their lives far in the future. But I see it is partially my siblings and my responsibility to assist them as they make decisions about their healthcare and the quality of their lives at each junction in the future. This book, written by a doctor, addresses issues our society has with healthcare and aging. Lots to think about.

18 comments:

  1. This book presents what we all must face, sooner rather than later. Thanks for sharing....and for visiting my blog.

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  2. The beginning certainly catches the eye. Very intriguing.

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  3. I listened to this one on audio. It was excellent- and very thought provoking. My dad is in a nursing home - he has dementia and is relatively young - just 69 now. I want my mom to read it, even though it isn't a very happy book.

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    1. So sorry to hear about your dad. 69 is so young. I am listening to this book, too. It is not riveting but yet it is very important info.

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  4. This sounds very interesting - I live with my parents who are both in their 70's now and so i am watching them age and sometimes I do get scared about their health issues and I'm trying to make sure my nieces and nephews understand that grandma and grandpa won't be with us forever and that they need to value the time they spend with them. Thanks for visiting my blog this morning!

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  5. Where does the time go...our lives are so busy...and one day we wake up to our parents' aging...and then our own...

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  6. Sounds like it does give you a lot to think about. I am spotlighting Sinner's Steel by Sarah Castille this week. Happy reading!

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  7. This sounds like a fascinating and informative book. As my husband and I age, I worry about having a lack of control over our lives. I'm wondering if this book gives some answers.
    Thank you for stopping by my blog today.
    Sandy @ TEXAS TWANG

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  8. This sounds like a book everyone can benefit far. We all have relatives who are aging and it's important to stay informed. I hope your weekend goes well!

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    1. Yes, I saw it on someone's list not long ago and decided I'd best read it. Now I want my siblings to read it, too.

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  9. Great beginning sentence.

    Thanks for sharing.

    ENJOY your weekend.

    Elizabeth
    Silver's Reviews
    My Book Beginnings

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  10. That beginning is pretty powerful!!
    Happy weekend!

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  11. Hi Anne,

    Like the rest of you, I have parents aged parents, who are probably approaching 'end of life' - My own father is 89 and MIL and FIL, 85 and 90 respectively.

    So much emphasis is being place by the authorities on making us able to live much longer, but at what cost to the quality of that life and the affect and consequences which are going to be felt by those nearest and dearest relatives and carers.

    I truly believe that each individual has the right to decide their own mortality and control the 'exit' path they choose to take.

    Quality rather than quantity is definitely my take on things, so I think that Gawande and I might agree on quite a few things in this book!

    An interesting choice of book, thanks for sharing and have a good weekend :)

    Yvonne.

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    1. I've only read half the book I am really finding myself rethinking issues related to my own mortality and hope I can have a frank discussion with my parents soon. My mother, a nurse, teaches a class at church called Mapping Your Exit. In it she teaches about getting your life and records in order, which means getting rid of junk, getting the Will in order, cleaning up finances, have medical directives in place. She worries she and Dad will be a burden. I worry about the quality of their lives as they near the end. I live over 250 miles away from them, so the majority of care will fall to my older sister who lives in town. So much to think about.

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  12. My dad has faced his aging by telling us he's staying in his house until there's a crisis, and my mother is going along because she's too tired to fight him. Ridiculous! He can't do anything for himself and also refuses a home health worker, so my 74 year old mother is the primary caregiver to my 83 yr old dad. He's wearing her out, and then we'll be left to deal with him. I've given her books, set up appointments and nothing changes. Oh well...
    Thanks for visiting, and for sharing this book. Maybe it's the one to make a difference.

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  13. My father passes many years ago. I'm thankful my mother is healthy and happy in her 80s. I see her slowing down and am thankful for every second we share together. I'd like to read this book.

    Here's my 56 - http://fuonlyknew.com/2015/10/02/love-the-snark-the-friday-56-80-brooklyn-bones/

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  14. What a shocker of an opening! It makes you wonder what they're dying of - they've gotta be dying, right? x

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    1. Yes, the book is about what we are currently doing about elder care in our countries and issues related to mortality. Nonfiction.

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