"Outside a dog a book is man's best friend, inside a dog it is too dark to read!" -Groucho Marx========="The person, be it gentleman or lady, who has not pleasure in a good novel, must be intolerably stupid." -Jane Austen========="I don’t believe in the kind of magic in my books. But I do believe something very magical can happen when you read a good book."-JK Rowling========"I spend a lot of time reading." -Bill Gates=========“Ahhh. Bed, book, kitten, sandwich. All one needed in life, really.” -Jacqueline Kelly=========

Wednesday, March 2, 2011

Read the ALA 2011 Book Award Winners Challenge

Read the 2011 ALA Award Winners Challenge
Read through the  2011 ALA Award-winning books. 
Copy the list(s) below to your own blog, indicate which
books you've read and post your reviews.

Deadline: December 31, 2011.



Levels:  
YA (9 books)
Children's (7 books)
Junior (8 books)
Combined: Any Two Sections (16)
All (23)

Read the 2011 Award Winners Challenge
 YA Titles
1. Michael L. Printz Award for excellence in literature written for young adults
“Ship Breaker,” written by Paolo Bacigalupi
2. Schneider Family Book Award for books that embody an artistic expression of the disability experience. The teen (ages 13-18) award winner is
“Five Flavors of Dumb,” written by Antony John
3. Alex Awards for the 10 best adult books that appeal to teen audiences (Pick one)
a. “The Reapers Are the Angels: A Novel,” by Alden Bell
b. “The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake: A Novel,” by Aimee Bender
c. “The House of Tomorrow,” by Peter Bognanni
d. “Room: A Novel,” by Emma Donoghue
e. “The Vanishing of Katharina Linden: A Novel,” by Helen Grant
f. “The Radleys,” by Matt Haig,
g. “The Lock Artist,” by Steve Hamilton
h. “Girl in Translation,” by Jean Kwok
 i. “Breaking Night: A Memoir of Forgiveness, Survival, and My Journey from Homeless to Harvard,” by Liz Murray
j. “The Boy Who Couldn’t Sleep and Never Had To,” by DC Pierson
4. Margaret A. Edwards Award honors an author for significant and lasting contribution to YA Lit  
Winning author: Sir Terry Pratchett  (Pick one book by him; if you do Junior level also you need only pick one book for both.)
5. Mildred L. Batchelder Award for an outstanding children’s book translated from a language other than English and subsequently published in the United States.
“A Time of Miracles” written by Anne-Laure Bondoux. Originally published in French in 2009 as “Le Temps des Miracles,” translated by Y. Maudet.
6. Stonewall Children’s and Young Adult Literature Award -children’s and young adult books of exceptional merit relating to the gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgendered experience
“Almost Perfect,” written by Brian Katcher
7. William C. Morris Award for a debut book by a first-time author writing for teens
“The Freak Observer,” written by Blythe Woolston
8. YALSA Award for Excellence in Nonfiction for Young Adults honors the best nonfiction book published for young adults
“Janis Joplin: Rise Up Singing,” written by Ann Angel
9. Odyssey Award for best audiobook produced for children and/or young adults (since the winner is a Junior book, pick one of the YA Odyssey Honor books listed: (pick one)
a. “The Knife of Never Letting Go,” written by Patrick Ness and narrated by Nick Podehl; 
b. “Revolution,” written by Jennifer Donnelly and narrated by Emily Janice Card and Emma Bering;
c. “will grayson, will grayson,” written by John Green and David Levithan, and narrated by MacLeod Andrews and Nick Podehl.

Children Titles
1. Randolph Caldecott Medal for the most distinguished American picture book for children
“A Sick Day for Amos McGee” illustrated by Erin E. Stead and written by Philip C. Stead.
2. Coretta Scott King (Illustrator) Book Award recognizing an African American illustrator of outstanding books for children and young adults
“Dave the Potter: Artist, Poet, Slave,” illustrated by Bryan Collier
3. Coretta Scott King/John Steptoe New Talent (Illustrator) Award
“Seeds of Change,” illustrated by Sonia Lynn Sadler and written by Jen Cullerton Johnson
4. Schneider Family Book Award for books that embody an artistic expression of the disability experience
“The Pirate of Kindergarten,” by George Ella Lyon, illustrated by Lynne Avril for children ages 0 to 10. 
5. Laura Ingalls Wilder Award honors an author or illustrator whose books a substantial and lasting contribution to literature for children.
The 2011 winner is Tomie dePaola, author and illustrator of over 200 books (Pick one)
6. Pura Belpré (Illustrator) Award honoring a Latino illustrator whose children’s books best portray, affirm and celebrate the Latino cultural experience.
“Grandma’s Gift,” illustrated and written by Eric Velasquez
7. Theodor Seuss Geisel Award for the most distinguished beginning reader book
“Bink and Gollie,” written by Kate DiCamillo and Alison McGhee and illustrated by Tony Fucile

Junior titles
1. John Newbery Medal for the most outstanding contribution to children’s literature
“Moon over Manifest,” written by Clare Vanderpool
2. Coretta Scott King (Author) Book Award recognizing an African American author of outstanding books for children and young adults
“One Crazy Summer,” written by Rita Williams-Garcia
3. Coretta Scott King/John Steptoe New Talent (Author) Award
“Zora and Me,” written by Victoria Bond and T. R. Simon
4. Pura Belpré (Author) Award honoring a Latino writer whose children’s books best portray, affirm and celebrate the Latino cultural experience
“The Dreamer,” written by Pam Muñoz Ryan
5. Margaret A. Edwards Award honors an author, as well as a specific body of his or her work, for significant and lasting contribution to young adult literature. 
Winning Author : Sir Terry Pratchett  (Pick one) (in combo with YA Level only read one by him for both)
6. Odyssey Award for best audiobook produced for children and/or young adults
 “The True Meaning of Smekday,” by Adam Rex and narrated by Bahni Turpin. (Junior)
7. Schneider Family Book Award for books that embody an artistic expression of the disability experience
“After Ever After,” written by Jordan Sonnenblick is the winner of the middle-school (ages 11-13).
8. Robert F. Sibert Medal for most distinguished informational book for children
“Kakapo Rescue: Saving the World’s Strangest Parrot,” written by Sy Montgomery


Sign up using the Mr. Linky Tool below and post a comment.  Have fun with this challenge reading really good Children's and Young Adult Lit.  Welcome.



2 comments:

  1. I'm posting a scaled down version of this list on my Challenge page, if you'd rather grab it the list from that spot. I plan on just reading the YA Titles.

    -Anne

    ReplyDelete
  2. I shall swing by your challenge page for another look. BTW, I am holding my first ever giveaway on my blog, My Bookshelf beginning Monday. Please come by. The contest is open to residents of USA and Canada!

    ReplyDelete

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